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I'm a Brit and for a long time it has been clear to me that our taste is a little conservative compared to our American cousins. In general we like plain lines, minimum ornamentation, and that's just in our women...when it comes to guitars the same rules apply ;-) I have almost a phobia against showy fretboard inlays, wheareas to some it is the very definition of a good guitar. What is wrong with us Brits? Are we all Basil Fawlty or Mr Bean types? Do we need to get a bit more exhibitionist?

Tags: guitars, inlays, ornamentation

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Heck, no!! Not all of us are enamoured with MOP and inlays that look like a truckdriver's belt buckle. Case in point: my plain ol' D-15 as seen in my avatar. My only concession to cosmetics is the ebony bridge pins. Less is truly more!
To inlay or not to inlay, I really don't care one way or anopther, I would never buy a acoustic because of the inlay. But then I wouldn't pass on a great guitar either because it had to much inlay.
So we shall not worry about such things my good man, just that your cousins on the other side of the pond, some care and some don't, the nakeder the better but thats just the way I roll in the mornings.Ship
I'm Dutch and I'm a minimalist too...
Green abolone inlays on rosewood or mahogony are perfect, in that they're so understated that you could even miss them entirely :)

OTOH a nicely inlaid neck can look stunning, as long as it's not too flashy.
Take this one for example (and take into account the terrible artwork Ibanez website artists produce, every single Ibanez guitar looks far better in reality than on the pictures): http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/ag_page09.php?data_id=14&color... (I've seen it, played it, passed it by for a Tanglewood. It's good, but a bit lacking in the lows for my taste).
Similarly, this one: http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/ag_page09.php?area_id=3&data_i... (never played it, but others who have say it's very nice).
Oooohhhh yah! plain and simple. even to the satin finish which i prefer. my only concession would be a nice sunburst.
the guilds have what they call 'ice-tea burst' & i really love looking at them, but otherwise; simpler is best to me.
Couldn't agree more, Kevin.Haven't seen those Guilds but they always make attractive guitars

kevin said:
Oooohhhh yah! plain and simple. even to the satin finish which i prefer. my only concession would be a nice sunburst.
the guilds have what they call 'ice-tea burst' & i really love looking at them, but otherwise; simpler is best to me.
I was being a bit tongue in cheek with the American thing, but agree with you about Naked Guitar being the way forward, as well as the best of tradition. Naked guitarists, on the other hand, will never catch on, especially in the UK where its cold and performance spaces are draughty
Ship of fools said:
To inlay or not to inlay, I really don't care one way or anopther, I would never buy a acoustic because of the inlay. But then I wouldn't pass on a great guitar either because it had to much inlay.
So we shall not worry about such things my good man, just that your cousins on the other side of the pond, some care and some don't, the nakeder the better but thats just the way I roll in the mornings.Ship
Hmmm, can see what you mean. My son had a very cool Ibanez electric which he would detune and rock out on. It had the sharks tooth inlays which for that shiny black guitar looked very cool indeed. Sadly he sold the guitar for driving lessons which to my mind is unforgivable :-)

Jeroen Wenting said:
I'm Dutch and I'm a minimalist too...
Green abolone inlays on rosewood or mahogony are perfect, in that they're so understated that you could even miss them entirely :)

OTOH a nicely inlaid neck can look stunning, as long as it's not too flashy.
Take this one for example (and take into account the terrible artwork Ibanez website artists produce, every single Ibanez guitar looks far better in reality than on the pictures): http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/ag_page09.php?data_id=14&color... (I've seen it, played it, passed it by for a Tanglewood. It's good, but a bit lacking in the lows for my taste).
Similarly, this one: http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/ag_page09.php?area_id=3&data_i... (never played it, but others who have say it's very nice).
Nice avatar/guitar...why not get some more pics of your favourite squeeze(s) on your profile page?
Kent Babcock said:
Heck, no!! Not all of us are enamoured with MOP and inlays that look like a truckdriver's belt buckle. Case in point: my plain ol' D-15 as seen in my avatar. My only concession to cosmetics is the ebony bridge pins. Less is truly more!
I guess I really just want them to notice the song and what I doing with whatever I'm playing, and not so much what I'm playing.

Like all of us, I have instruments that I play that I... "just like." The Taylor is my finest sounding guitar, (along with the Washburn for fingerpicking); but I play the 1933 Martin archtop more; just because of what it represents to me. I put a MOP inlay tailpiece I got from Vietnam on it, and while it looked pretty; it felt out of place. I took it off.

Sometime flashiness just gets in the way.
Hey Joseph what type of Washburn do you fingerpick on, me I am a Washburn fan since discovering one back in 2003 and have found them to be one of the most under rated guitars for the money out there, most folks do not realize the history behind the company and how all companies really have had a hand in each others making for those early years and that msot amke guitars almost the same way, with just slight variations to each others.Ship
I've got a J12SN. It's the small jumbo. I bought one new years ago. Gave it away to a missionary friend I know. It's the only guitar I've ever replaced with an exact copy. I found another one almost mint in Austin, TX. for $190.00 with TKL case.

I'm with you. I'm a big guitar history buff. I've also got a 1890's Thompson & O'Dell parlor that I love. I bought it when I was looking for a turn of the century Washburn parlor. Man, they're pricey.
Are those who like a bit of flashiness in their guitars, into the 'bling' in general, with their homes, their cars, ostentatious jewellery etc? Is an ornate guitar a quest to demonstrate individuality, or is it the definition of good taste for the buyer?
My little brother is a 'petrol head'. I am pleased to say he has ditched his Porsche, then his Maserati and bought a 60's Mercedes. Much more understated, much more cool, in my book. Not that I can relate to cars as status objects in any way!

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