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Coffee House Players

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Coffee House Players

A place to talk about your gigs and your song list and what ever else you want to talk aboout

Members: 184
Latest Activity: Dec 11

Discussion Forum

Unwanted Accompaniment ... how best to handle? 15 Replies

Started by Jud Hair. Last reply by paul stokes Jul 11.

Is Open Mic in Some Ways Harder than a Straight Gig? 16 Replies

Started by Jud Hair. Last reply by Randy Lee Hano Apr 30.

Gig length, set list, originals vs. covers, etc. 16 Replies

Started by Jason Derrick. Last reply by Randy Lee Hano Apr 30.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Marty on June 26, 2014 at 2:48pm

Looks like you and your lovely wife/security guard are enjoying yourselves!! Love the Gibson. What year of Gibson? Also thanks much for the lesson!!

Comment by Randy Lee Hano on June 18, 2014 at 3:55pm

Cool link Edward!

Comment by Jim Yates on June 17, 2014 at 2:50pm

James Taylor - Fire & Rain

He is very clear Edward.  Here's the man himself showing you how to do it. 

Comment by Edward Sparks on June 17, 2014 at 12:53pm

Hey, I already have been doing this song for years, but this guy is pretty good at teaching it! 

http://www.guitarplayer.com/lessons/1014/video-lesson-learn-to-play...

Comment by Edward Sparks on June 11, 2014 at 8:49am

Well, at least the security is pretty!  Actually this is my wife Teri keeping the women from charging the stage! :-)

Comment by Edward Sparks on June 8, 2014 at 12:29pm
Hey, being a working musician does have it's perks! In this case free freshly made, still hot kettle corn! Not to mention a crab cake sandwich, drinks and some generous tips!
Photo: Hey, being a working musician does have it's perks! In this case free freshly made, still hot kettle corn! Not to mention a crab cake sandwich, drinks and some generous tips!
Comment by Phil Manuel on May 19, 2014 at 2:46pm
Ha, ain't that the truth! Of course, that works for "D" or "A" too, doesn't it? ;-)
Comment by Jim Yates on May 19, 2014 at 2:43pm

I recall sitting in on mandolin with a bluegrass band and when someone asked, "What are we playing now?" the leader said, "Let's do the one that's not in G."

Comment by Randy Lee Hano on May 19, 2014 at 11:05am

Great words Edwards. Even seasoned players sometimes forget the rules.

Comment by Edward Sparks on May 19, 2014 at 7:06am

This is obviously not for the seasoned player who should already know how to do this, but I thought it was really a great bit of advice! 

THREE STEPS TO A KILLER SET LIST

AP

 

A WELL-THOUGHT-OUT set list can be vital to the success of your gig. You wouldn’t put together a CD without thinking long and hard about the selection and order of the songs; nor should you construct a set list without just as much careful consideration. But what really makes up a good set list? It obviously depends quite a bit on the style of music that your band plays, but here are some general guidelines to maximize the impact of your song sequence. (Note that these steps are designed for a group or solo act playing a one-set gig, but the principles can obviously be applied to multiple-set engagements, as well.)


Start With A Bang If you’re trying to grab the audience’s attention (and of course, you are), you want to make sure you start the show out with one of your really strong songs. First impressions are very important, so your first number should be one that stylistically represents what your music is all about. In most cases, your opening tune should be up-tempo, but be careful to choose something that you are confident that you can play before you’re really warmed up.

End With A Splash Your ending number should be the pinnacle of your set, a song that you hope will leave the audience shouting for more. This is where you should pull out all the stops. It’s also important to keep a good song in reserve so that you don’t have to repeat something if you are called back for an encore.

Mix It Up A good way to approach putting together your set list is to first decide on the opening and ending songs, then fill in the rest of the set. As you’re picking out these in-between songs, remember to not put too many similar songs back to back. Watch especially for songs that have the same kind of feel (for example, you don’t want to do two ballads in a row). If you also vary the song tempos and the keys, your set will be more interesting and will hold the crowd’s attention better. When your set list is done, be sure to make copies for each bandmember, written or printed in large, easy to- read letters (crucial for those dark stages) with the keys noted for each song. —MIKE LEVINE

 

 

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