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Martin Owners

For those who own one or more Martin guitars, those who want to own a Martin, or those who just like talking about Martins

Members: 488
Latest Activity: 10 hours ago

Discussion Forum

A Family Affair at Martin Guitar 2 Replies

Started by Dave Fengler. Last reply by Jud Hair Dec 6.

Time for a Change 8 Replies

Started by Mike Bishop. Last reply by Alan Land Oct 31.

anyone been to the exhibit at the Met Museum? 2 Replies

Started by michael schwartz. Last reply by michael schwartz Oct 30.

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Comment by Robert Blanford on February 1, 2012 at 2:24pm

Hey Ed,   My martin is a 000-28 built in 1972.  I have kept it in mint condition.

Had the neck adjusted about 4 years ago.  I'll take some pictures and post. Robert Blanford

Comment by Edward Sparks on February 1, 2012 at 2:20pm

Robert Blanford...welcome to the group!  Please tell us more about your Martin and post some pics if you'd like...we just love this kinda stuff!  Edward 

Comment by Jud Hair on February 1, 2012 at 10:14am

Michael ... thanks. that's sort of what I suspected.  The brief official history pretty much glosses over the situation, understandably I suppose.

Comment by Michael S. Jackson on February 1, 2012 at 10:07am

Jud -

If you get the books on Martin history (Martin Guitars: A History by Johnston, Boak, & Longworth [Book One; Book Two is an historical reference]; Martin Guitars by Washburn & Johnston; and the Martin Book by Walter Carter) you can read about each of the family leaders of the Martin company and about their guitars. If I recall correctly, Chris spent lots of time with his grandfather in the shops and the company business whereas his father (divorced from his mother) was more interested in booze, fast cars, and slow women.

I think his father did run the business for a while and the guitars made during his tenure were not of the best quality (different glues used in copius amounts in an effort to stave off warranty repair, etc.). I think he also started a line of drums...

I'm sure someone will correct me if I don't recall correctly, and I'm not about to identify the years of inferior quality 'cuz someone will act like they were gut shot, but the jist is that Chris cared about the company his grandfather led whereas his father did not.

Anyway, these books are a fascinating read - I'm sure you'd enjoy them.

m

Comment by Jud Hair on February 1, 2012 at 7:36am

Question for you Martin historians ...

I was reading the official history of the company last night and I noticed in the line of succession that current company head C.F. Martin IV took over the company while his own dad was still alive and relatively young.

The official Martin history simply says ... After the death of his grandfather, C. F. Martin III, on June 15, 1986, C. F. Martin IV was appointed Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, indicating his responsibility for leading Martin into the next century.

I guess my question is ... what's the back story (if any) behind Chris taking over at so young and age while his own father was still living and at the time apparently still active in running the company.

It was apparent that Chris's dad died relatively young (60-ish).  Did he become ill and unable to run the company? 

As I say, just curious.

Comment by Greg Brandt / Maker of Guitars on January 28, 2012 at 11:19pm

Good choice to have all the frets replaced......I've never liked doing partial re-frets unless I have done the previous re-fret and have the exact same wire. Your guitar will be great....and great photos too!

Comment by Edward Sparks on January 28, 2012 at 8:58pm

Yes, it is in for a neck reset and Raymond suggested just replacing the few frets necessary, but I wanted to have the whole thing done...might as well while it's apart!  Edward

Comment by Bob Crain on January 28, 2012 at 5:48pm

Edward, I take it you are having the neck re-set as well, I hated seen my guitar in pieces when I had it done. I put slightly larger frets on my D-28 the last time I had it done seems to finger just a bit lighter with the larger frets, and I am heavy fingered to say the least but I am working on lightening up.

Comment by Edward Sparks on January 28, 2012 at 10:22am

Continuing work on the refret of my 1980 Martin D-28 12 string...Many thinks to the professional work done by Patrick Raymond of Raymond Guitars!  Yeah, that's me playing a Raymond 12 string from his webiste!

http://www.patrickraymondguitars.com/

removing the old frets...

Using the fret press to set frets up to neck joint...

Setting the last few frets by hand...

refretted neck!

Comment by Jud Hair on January 24, 2012 at 6:14pm

Guy ... amazing.  I live in Raleigh and frequent the Raleigh GC, but I never saw the GCPA-4 you bought.  Saw a DCPA-4 there for $795 though.  Had a really UGLY spruce top though and I'm sure that's why it was not selling.  The top was very "muddled" and dark brown, like I say "ugly" ... Sounded fine, but I'd already bought mine for $1,080 retail.

 

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